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Mårten Trotzigs Gränd

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Mårten Trotzigs Gränd 111 29
Stockholm, Sweden

59.3204° N, 18.0703° E

Mårten Trotzigs Gränd is the narrowest street on the Scandinavian Peninsula in the very heart of Stockholm. It takes place on the oldest island - Gamlastan. Every tourist usually plans to visit the ancient district, so don't miss the fourth narrowest alley in the world. The smallest distance between the walls is 90 sm in the exact place. As a result, it may be not enough even for two people to disperse. Moreover, it has 37 steps up to Prästgatan street which makes the view even more peculiar. So be careful when it's freezing outside!
The street bears the name of a German burgher Mårten Trotzig, that moved to Stockholm in 1581. He bought two properties here and opened a shop. In some years Mårten Trotzig became the richest merchant in the city. According to the documents found, he sold iron and copper on these streets.
  The first name of the alley was Tronge trappe grenden that we can translate as "narrow alley stairs". It was mentioned in 1544. And since the burgher appeared the name changed several times. Trappegrenden - "the Stairs alley", Kungsgränden - "the Kings alley", and eventually street is called Mårten Trotzigs Gränd since 1949. That year the city reopened it after a century of abandonment.
This is a perfect location for untypical urban shots. A few pieces of graffiti cover the walls at the flat part of the alley. Therefore, it will create a specific mix of modern and old town landscapes in the background. If you are a follower of more authentic views, vintage lanterns above the ancient stairs will make your image stylish.
Mårten Trotzigs Gränd can compete in thickness only with three narrower representatives around the world.
  1. Spreuerhofstrasse in Reutlingen, Germany. 40 centimeters wide on the average and 31 centimeters at the narrowest point!
  2. Parliament street in Exeter, England. 64 centimeters on the one edge.
  3. Fan Tan Alley in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. 89 centimeters wide.
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